IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT

The “It’s not your fault!” sequence of Good Will Hunting puts forth what is probably the quote (repeated over and over again) that has most permeated pop culture. “It’s not your fault!” Robin Williams insists. Though my peers and I incorporate many a GWH reference into our conversations, “It’s not your fault” seems to be a genuine cultural reference among non-devotees.

Last spring Apple ran an ad with some genuine GWH subtext, as noted by blogger Gabe Jacobs. Have Matt and Ben made their mark upon the very language of psychotherapy? Move over, “how does that make you feel?”!

Does this make Minnie Driver a Mac? Because Skylar totally would be.

Time to Re-Team?

IMDb is predicting a 2011 release date for an Untitled Ben Affleck/Matt Damon Project. Good Will Hunting Devotees have been wondering — why so long, Matt and Ben, to follow up your roles as Oscar-winning screenwriters? Sophomore slump? According to People Magazine (you heard me):

In terms of professional projects, though they’ve costarred and shared cameos in various films and collaborated as producers on different projects, Affleck and Damon haven’t been paired together on screen for five years. Affleck says the timing now feels right to re-team once again. “Supposedly we’re doing this thing next year” once their busy schedules dovetail, Affleck said. For his part, Damon has to complete three films – including a fourth turn as Jason Bourne – while Affleck, who received warm reviews for his 2007 directorial effort Gone Baby Gone, will be directing and starring in The Town, which Variety reports is an adaptation of the Chuck Hogan novel The Prince of Thieves. “Matt is always pretty busy but claiming that he’s going to try and slow it down a little bit,” says his buddy. “He doesn’t mind taking a year to wait. I would love to, it’s great, and we’re both busy. Matt lives in Miami, so it’s hard to get a chance to see him. If we work together it’s an excuse to hang out.”

So they’ve been busy. Too busy to make a movie together, apparently. This begs the question, though… not too busy for best friend surfing safari?

Surf's up!

Matt Damon: Blond Again

Just saw this on boston.com (my source for hometown hero news) this morning:

Damon

Blond Matt Damon is back! Hooray!

To readers of this blog, a towheaded Matt Damon has many nostalgic associations. But when was the last time we saw Matt Damon with goldilocks? A quick browse through his filmography leads me to believe that it was probably 2000’s The Legend of Bagger Vance, not one of Damon’s more memorable roles.

Which leads me to a second thought: while Damon hasn’t had the identity problems of his friend Ben Affleck and has managed to maintain a degree of both professional respect and profitability, I think we can all agree that there has been a second act to his career. And you can track it through his follicles.

Matt Damon burst onto the national scene as a fresh-faced young man ready to make good on all his potential, and it was a character we grew to love, from Good Will Hunting, through Rounders, to Titan A.E. As his darker roots grew out, though, he began to take on more serious roles (his turn as sociopath Tom Ripley being an obvious exception). The real shift came with 2003’s The Bourne Identity. Matt Damon reinvented his career. I think Paul Rudd’s character in The 40 Year Old Virgin best summed up the feelings of many pleasantly surprised viewers, who previously had ignored Damon’s talents: “I always thought Matt Damon was kind of a Streisand, but he is rockin’ the shit in this one.”

Yes, he was.

It was this Matt Damon we watched in the Bourne sequels, in Martin Scorsese’s The Departed, in The Good Shepherd, in Syriana: a Matt Damon with a past he wasn’t ready to deal with; a Matt Damon with secrets he would hide from everyone, including himself; a Matt Damon driven by something he couldn’t understand or even name.

What will Matt Damon’s return to his blond roots bring for his career? We’ll have to wait and see. I will say this, though: It’s good to have you back, Blond Matt Damon. We missed you.